Week #5 – Newspapers

Week #5 – Newspapers

Did you miss Week #4? <– Go here

Class recording from Zoom on 9/28/22

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/kOtYIvStPOhdJHOHW5Hng5hjZV475ERoT3iXmbnz_QiI3mISkhxcKTs0tvCfUFQS.p4nIhtv_BlK_Xwqg

Passcode: v3?#a5DL

 

Some History of Newspapers:

(A simple Google search brings up many examples, what can you find and share? Here are a few various snippets from the Web)

https://www.quintype.com/blog/business/a-brief-history-of-newspapers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_newspaper_publishing

https://www.psprint.com/resources/history-of-the-printed-newspaper/

Discussion in Class

  • How many of us in our class subscribe to (or at least read) a daily newspaper? How many read a daily paper online? How does that compare with the general adult population – and with young Americans as a group? What do these demographic trends say about the future of newspapers?
  • How many of us are news “junkies”? Meaning, one who checks the news several times a day. What are the most popular sources for getting news (such as the newspaper, television, radio and the Internet). Are news junkies really better informed than people who read a newspaper once a day?
  • How do you get your news? Who are your favorite news bloggers, columnists, or reporters? How does the source (either the reporter or medium) affect the credibility of the story being reported?

Let us watch the first 31 minutes of the documentary “Page One” below.

Think about the following questions: (then add your response to the comments section below as our discussion board assignment for tis week)

  1. Many believe that journalism is an important part of our society. Without good journalism, our democracy will be in jeopardy. Do you believe in this viewpoint?
  2. Many newspapers are struggling. Are you willing to pay for a paper or digital subscription to support the newspaper industry? Explain why or why not.
  3. Many people get their news from television and the Internet. Do you think newspapers provide a different kind of journalism?

“Page One” – https://vimeo.com/203886766/3ea4a7c5b3

Please write a 150 – 300-word response and post it into the comments section below, preferably by our next class time. You will also need to comment on one of your classmates’ responses by the following week as well. Engage!

(***I strongly suggest that you generate your response(s) using a word processing application like ms word, pages or notes first, make the necessary spelling and grammatical corrections and then copy and paste your work into the comments section below***)

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CHAPTER 4

PRINT TO DIGITAL NEWSPAPERS

Excerpts from CHAPTER 4

**Although the textbook is not mandatory for our class, I will reference it and share excerpts and info from it – I do find that you may find it helpful as a companion, as well as a resource for your final term paper. (The book’s info is on the course syllabus page.)

 

KEY ISSUES OF JOURNALISM
Wrestling with commercial interests & political powers (Media conglomeration)

Press Freedom
(Reporters without borders) <– website URL

Censorship VS. national national interest (Wikileaks, Edward Snowden)

Social responsibility and journalism ethics (Food Lion)

TIMELINE
1690 First American newspaper, Public Occurrences, published.
1773 John Peter Zenger trial establishes truth as a defense for press against libel charges.
1783 First daily newspaper published in America, Pennsylvania Evening Post, and Daily Advertiser.
1833 First penny press, The New York Sun, begins publication.
1878 New Journalism movement originated by Joseph Pulitzer.
1972 Watergate scandal inspires new era of investigative journalism
USA Today national daily launched.
1994 The World Wide Web signals a change in the newspaper industry.
2004 Political blogs rival newspaper columns.
2009 Detroit Free Press and Detroit News begin hybrid model of three-day home delivery supplemented by online delivery.

NEWSPAPERS EMERGE
Early newsletters read aloud to the public
Daily Courant (1702) – England’s first daily newspaper
First colonial newspaper – Publick Occurrences (1690)
American publishers criticize British rule
Zenger case (1733) – Libel defined
“True statements are not libelous”
Editorial cartoon – Ben Franklin (1754)

FIRST AMENDMENT
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

DIVERSITY IN THE PRESS
Newspapers reflected diverse political views
Native American press
Cherokee Phoenix
African-American press
Freedom’s Journal (1827 in NYC)
North Star (1847 by Frederick Douglass)

THE PENNY PRESS
1800s: better printing technology
Growing literacy, higher wages
The New York Sun: First low-cost daily mass newspaper (1833)
Had to rely on advertising and paper boys
Modern journalism started to evolve
Rise of telegraph (Morse) and Associated Press (AP)
Lowered costs
More general-interest news
Wider appeal
More objective

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Started in in 1892
operates 243 bureaus in 120 countries
Published by more than 1700 newspapers and 5000 broadcasters
“Inverted pyramid” style

FOLLOWING THE FRONTIER
Newspapers expanded westward
Mark Twain began career as a newspaper journalist
Coverage of Civil War
“New journalism”
Lively, sensational; crusaded against corruption
First newspaper photos by Matthew Brady

YELLOW JOURNALISM
Late 1800s; rivalry between Pulitzer (NY World) and Hearst (NY Journal)
“The Yellow Kid”
Fierce competition
Decline in journalists’ ethics
Over-the-top stories and fake interviews

JOSEPH PULITZER
1847-1911
Elected Congressman from New York’s 9th District
The money he bequeathed to found Columbia Journalism School in 1912
The money he bequeathed to Columbia University founded the Pulitzer Prize in 1917

RESPONSIBLE JOURNALISM
Journalism grew as respectable profession
By-lines, higher salaries
Focus on social conditions
New York Times, Chicago Tribune emerged as serious newspapers
Progressive era (early 1900s), muckraking reflected society’s desire for reform

NEWSPAPERS REACH PEAK
Peaked as a mass medium between 1890 and 1920
1900: 1,967 U.S. dailies, 562 cities with competing papers
Mergers, consolidation cut number of papers
Hurt papers’ quality, diversity

PROFESSIONAL JOURNALISM
World Wars I and II (CPI & OWI)
Censorship
Propaganda
Social responsibility model
Rise of journalism schools (Columbia, CUNY, NYU, Syracuse, Stony Brook)
Professional associations
Codes of ethics (Society of Professional Journalists)

Competition from radio, TV
Chains own dailies, weeklies, TV stations
Rise in community papers
Citizen journalism growing
Professional, amateur journalists

THE WATCHDOGS
Journalists watching for government mistakes, public deception
Vietnam War – Pentagon Papers
Watergate coverage led to Nixon’s resignation (Deep Throat)

TECHNOLOGY TRENDS
News-gathering, Computer-assisted Reporting, big data
Convergence (integration of media) – get it out and fix it later
Backpack journalism – more interactive
Online and mobile news
Focus on community news
Tablets = reading more news
Digital means lower costs for publishers
“Daily Me” – customization
Twitter and blogs

THE NEWS LANDSCAPE
Mass audiences still exist for news; combination of traditional, digital outlets
National dailies: Wall Street Journal and USA Today
Suburban/metro dailies
Hybrid system
Local, alternative weeklies
News wire services, syndicates

TURNING THE PAGES
Newspaper sections
International, national, local
Editorial and commentary
Sports, business, lifestyles, entertainment, comics
Classified advertising
Online sections even narrower

APPS AND WEBSITES
Most adults get news from a mobile device
They also get their news from a variety of outlets
Circulation = print and digital audience…in most cases

MEDIA LITERACY
Monopoly paper may reflect single editorial perspective
Government has relaxed media ownership restrictions
Joint operating agreements (JOA) may preserve newspapers- DFF & DN share facilities
but keep writers separate; publishes separate weekday editions but combined weekend editions

FREEDOM OF SPEECH
Newspapers more protected than radio or TV in U.S.
Can take unpopular stands (McCarthyism)
Other countries: Journalists censored, fired, even killed (Daniel Pearl of WSJ 2002)

ETHICS
Accuracy, objectivity
Ethics linked to credibility, economic success
Possible trouble areas:
Plagiarism
Fabrication
Anonymous sources

RIGHT TO KNOW VS. PRIVACY
Treatment of public figures
Malice
Libel (print) v.s. Slander (say): false and defamatory
Private citizens protected
Tabloid journalism
Sensational coverage (Perez Hilton)
Pay sources for information

BEING A GOOD WATCHDOG
Investigative reporting
1960s and ‘70s: Watergate, Vietnam
Blogs’ watchdog role
Often partisan
Driven by political passion
Objective?

DEFINING NEWS
News elements help determine what is “news”-Timeliness, significance,
proximity, prominence, human interest, relevance, conflict, controversy
Watchdog journalism sells news
Our perception of news is changing
Editors and “gatekeeping”

 

Week #4 – Books & Magazines

Week #4 – Books & Magazines

Did you miss week #3 < — go here

In more Media Consolidations news… Design Software Giants ADOBE set to acquire FIGMAArticle via Forbes

**Here is the class zoom recording from 9/21 below –

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/X6WcmwVrEbRng86NmtK4VfiIPtOM1pIUiFh8CW-PdT1ei69wgzrLtacnFEmOE2Wg.ZVgfT_oJBkrscMVU

Passcode: Mt7Wut!v

Its time to talk about our semester’s Final Term Paper, the process and time-line of submissions! Exciting times!

Here are the details via the Syllabus:

  • Final Term Paper Details – Students are required to write one term paper on a topic related to media (6 pages – NOT including the bibliography). All essays must document their sources. I suggest following the APA style to document sources (Reference: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/). All essays (including the draft) must be submitted to me via e-mail – rseslow@york.cuny.edu – the essays will incorporate a “scaffolding” process to guide students toward longer written assignments. The scaffolded assignment structure pulls first from the courses reflective blog posts; you will select one of these topics to expand upon for your formal final term paper. Students will first submit a final paper topic proposal via e-mail. (Brief 1-2 paragraph description of the topic and how it will be researched and discussed) After your topic has been approved, you must submit a rough draft at specified due dates; at this time, the professor will propose revisions to the rough draft and a classroom writing workshop will allow students to engage with the material and learn from each other in improving elements of style, organization, content, and editing. Following this process ensures the professor and students remain engaged in an ongoing dialogue that continuously progresses and improves the final drafts which will be turned in at the midpoint and end of the semester.

Final Term Paper Time-line:

  1. Between 9/21 -10/7 students will work on and submit a final term paper topic proposal via e-mail. (1-2 paragraph description of the topic and how it will be researched and discussed)

2. During the week of 10/19 – Students will submit a final term paper Bibliography / sources page (yes you can more as you go)

3. During the week of 11/9 – Students will submit a final term paper draft

4. During the week of 12/7 – Students will submit their final term paper

Books & Magazines

Let’s watch this report from CNBC about book sales in the U.K. – (2019)

In comments section below, please answer the follow questions:

What is your overall reaction?

  1. When was the last time you purchased a book (paper or digital) that is not a textbook? What book was it?
  2. What is your preferred way of reading? Paper or digital? Explain why?
  3. Recommend a book to your fellow classmates. Explain why you think they should read it.

Please write a 150 – 300-word response and post it into the comments section below, preferably by our next class time. You will also need to comment on one of your classmates’ responses by the following week as well. Engage!

(***I strongly suggest that you generate your response(s) using a word processing application like ms word, pages or notes first, make the necessary spelling and grammatical corrections and then copy and paste your work into the comments section below***)


CHAPTER 3 -> Excerpts

BOOKS AND MAGAZINES

Excerpts from CHAPTER 3

**Although the textbook is not mandatory for our class, I will reference it and share excerpts and info from it – I do find that you may find it helpful as a companion, as well as a resource for your final term paper. (The book’s info is on the course syllabus page.)

EARLY PRINT MEDIA
Greek epics (Odyssey)
Japanese Tale of Genji (11th Century)

CHINA: INVENTION OF PAPER
105 CE (AD 105)
Tsai Lun – Also developed brushes and ink
Carved printing blocks in pieces of wood
By 1051, the Chinese put together a metal, clay and wooden press.
Check this -> Video link

IMPORTANCE OF MONKS
Many devoted their lives to copying text and creating beautiful illustration
Book of Kells (800 CE)
Illustrated manuscript
Gospel book in Latin
Housed in Trinity College Dublin
Video Link

THE GUTENBERG REVOLUTION
Gutenberg Bible (1455)
Mass production of books, newsletters, handbills at low cost (one-fifth the cost of copying by hand)
Earliest publications: Bible, prayer books, hymnals

Beyond religious works: broadside ballads, chapbooks, entertainment Libraries
First lending library in 1602; England
Bookstalls – Located in railway stations

FIRST AMERICAN PRINT MEDIA
Bay Psalm Book (1640)
Harvard Press
Poor Richard’s Almanack (1732)
Benjamin Franklin
“moral advice”
Paine’s Common Sense
Sold 100,000 copies in 10 weeks

Subscription libraries
Again, B. Franklin
Magazines
Gentleman’s Magazine (1731)
“elegant and amusing writing”
Miscellanies
Small, far-flung, diverse audience

Copyright Act of 1790
Gave authors, publishers exclusive rights
Royalties paid to reproduce work
Magazines limited to better-educated, wealthy elite, and a small, growing middle-class

Publishers took up political causes: “Federalist Papers”
Port Folio – Federalist Party
First magazine with substantial national circulation

Literary miscellanies: Saturday Evening Post (early 1800s)
Introduced American writers
Illustrated weeklies: Harper’s Weekly introduced Civil War drawings

America reads
Improved conditions for books, magazines
Higher wages
Urban middle class
Economies of scale
Improved printing technology
Greater demand for print media

Last of the Mohicans (1826)
Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852)
Dime novels: Horatio Alger
The Postal Act of 1879
Reliance on advertising
New genres, “pulp” fiction (pushed social bounds)

MODERN MUCKRAKING
Investigative reporting
Reformers pushed for justice
Targets corruption, abuse of power
The Nation
Mother Jones
Web magazines
Blogs

MODERN MAGAZINES
After 1920s, magazines competed with radio and film
Some magazines tried mass appeal; others targeted narrow, loyal audiences
Advertising shifted to television, though many magazines thrived

After the Great Recession of 2007, magazines were considered “luxury” items
Fewer ad pages
Lower circulation
Began a rebound in 2012

Proliferation of specialized magazines
1950: 250 magazines
Today, there are more than 20,700 magazines
Desktop publishing & Web lowered barriers to entry

BOOK PUBLISHING GIANTS
As printing costs declined and more Americans could afford books, publishing grew
“Book” rate for mailing books
Book clubs popularized reading
WWII began paperback era

Image of book publisher is changing
Definition of “book” has changed
e-book
audiobook
number of books continues to rise

Publishing industry growing
Publishers selling directly to public
Bookstore chains publishing own books
On-demand public domain titles
Amazon Kindle Direct
Google Books

Publishing industry growing
Technology is helping conventional publishers
Social media, consumer databases
In China, mobile devices/Internet more popular than e-readers
Cell phone apps needed

FROM CHAPBOOK TO E-BOOK
After Gutenberg
Rotary press (1846)
Photoengraving (1861)
Offset printing (post-WWII)
Computer to plate (1970s)
Desktop publishing (1990s)
Bar-code/“QR” scanners (2000s)

PUBLISHING
Four evolutions
E-commerce (Amazon)
Kindle’s impact on e-books
On-demand and self-publishing of books
Google’s digitization of books

Readers mixed on e-books
Easier to read on e-readers than computer, tablet
Problems with e-books
Piracy, illegal swapping
Magazines moving online, adding video, audio, animation

INDUSTRY: GOING GLOBAL
Magazines target readers
Audience = circulation X readers per copy
Most revenue (60 percent) is from advertising
Other revenue:
Subscriptions (30 percent)
Single-copy sales (10 percent)

CIRCULATION AND ADVERTISING
Consumer magazines
Subscriptions = 90 percent of circulation
Single-copy sales = more revenue per copy
Trade magazines
Highly-targeted audience
Often subscription only

Some magazines struggling
Circulation has dropped
Free information online
2007 recession
So has advertising
Magazines, newspapers, TV, radio, online media

Influence of magazine wholesalers, distributors
Places magazine in store, in particular location on newsstand
Exception: Wal-Mart bypasses distributors

MAGAZINE INDUSTRY
New magazines must appeal to new market segment
Many new magazines acquired by conglomerates
Time Warner owns 19 magazines (13 percent of company revenue)

BOOK PUBLISHING ECONOMICS
Growing industry ($26 billion in 2017)
Thanks to movie business
Books to movies
Movies to books
Search for best sellers

Publishing houses
Bookstores
Physical
Online
Women buy more books than men (printed, e-book, audio)

MAGAZINE AND BOOK GENRES
Magazines for every taste
Even small-circulation magazines can be profitable
Major book categories
Trade, professional, textbooks, paperback, religious, book club, mail-order, subscription reference, multimedia, scholarly presses
Top book genre is fiction

MEDIA LITERACY
Books: ideas vs. commodities
Redefining role of magazines
Distribution issues
Intellectual property and copyright
Libraries, censorship, free speech, First Amendment

TOP-SELLING BOOKS
NY Times
Amazon
Barnes and Nobles

TOP-SELLING MAGAZINES
https://www.agilitypr.com/resources/top-media-outlets/top-10-american-magazines/

 

Week #3 – The Media Impact

Week #3 – The Media Impact

Welcome back!

Did you miss week #2’s post and need a recap? Go here 

Here is the recording from our class on 9/14

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/iOpYw_lCFWoCPya-WQP9C3IurKOYpSmVrSZyUkskmxaw3jYsJRjXQRMPJgDIkN86.LOZayFGpZvu69BrW

Passcode: K6wS@jxJ

Class discussion:

1. Was Steve Jobs a monopolist or not? Explain your position.

2. List all the media you used today and define the functions associated with each one.

3. What is your favorite digital medium, and how does it make money from you?

4. Twitter isn’t very popular among college students. How can you explain that in diffusion of innovation terms?

 

“Individuals and society also have the power to influence the success of media technology. The diffusion of innovations theory has its roots in sociology and helps us understand why people adopt new communication behaviors (Rogers, 1995). Diffusion is a process by which an innovation—a new way of doing things—is communicated through media and interpersonal channels over time among the members of a community.

For example, researcher Everett Rogers (1986) observed that VCRs diffused very quickly in the United States, going from 1 percent of American households in 1980 to 20 percent in 1985 (to 82 percent in 2007). Prices are important in diffusion. VCR prices declined rapidly, from $2,200 in 1975 to under $100 in 2004. Now DVD players and digital video recorders are rapidly replacing VCRs. As a general rule, all new technologies follow a similar price pattern: the first few units sold cost 10 or more times as much as the last units sold…”

 Media now: Understanding media, culture, and technology (9th ed.) Straubhaar, J., LaRose R. & Davenport L. (2015). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.  

Technopoly / Technocracy – and the future?

Discussion Board Assignment #2 –

This week, the topic for the discussion board is “media consolidation”

In the 1980s, about 50 companies controlled the U.S. media. Today, about 5-7 large media conglomerates own most of the media companies in the U.S..

Let’s watch an interview (from 2017) of former FCC commissioner Michael Copps talking about how greater media consolidation is a threat to our democracy and free speech:

In comments section below, please answer the follow questions:

What do you think about media consolidation?

Do you agree or disagree?

Explain your reasons / views on Why?

Do you have other related thoughts or reactions? (which could be in the form of a personal story. Please Share!

Please write a 150 – 300-word response and post it into the comments section below, preferably by our next class time. You will also need to comment on one of your classmates’ responses by the following week as well. Engage!

(***I strongly suggest that you generate your response(s) using a word processing application like ms word, pages or notes first, make the necessary spelling and grammatical corrections and then copy and paste your work into the comments section below***)


MEDIA AND SOCIETY

Excerpts from CHAPTER 2

**Although the textbook is not mandatory for our class, I will reference it and share excerpts and info from it – I do find that you may find it helpful as a companion, as well as a resource for your final term paper. (The book’s info is on the course syllabus page.)

UNDERSTANDING THE MEDIA
Do media change society or reflect society?
Mutual relationship between media and culture
Theories on how media institutions function..

MEDIA ECONOMICS
Media exist to make money
Mass production, distribution are keys to economic success
Profits reaped by producing many copies at lowest cost
Large audiences help media companies recoup first-copy costs

MEDIA ECONOMICS
Economies of scale
Cut staff, automate, merge
Reduce marginal costs
Difficult with digital media
Big companies have advantage over “mom and pop” news outlets

Benefits of competition
Law of supply and demand
Good for consumers
Lower prices
Better products
Marginal costs

Media monopolies
No pressure to be efficient
Can raise prices (and profits)
Not always bad … but often bad
Duopoly
Oligopoly

Barriers to entry
Lack of diversity in content
Profit motive
Profits: what’s left after paying costs, taxes, paybacks to investors
Sometimes compromise relationships with customers
Media use different methods to recoup first-copy costs
Profits are not always paramount (PBS)

HOW MEDIA MAKE MONEY
Direct sales (buy an iPod…)
Rentals (rent video game)
Subscriptions (newspaper, magazine, cable)
Usage fees (movie ticket, pay-per-view)
Advertising (newspapers, magazines, TV, radio)
More viewers/readers = higher advertising rates

Syndication (TV reruns, newspaper cartoons)
License fees (song royalties)
Subsidies (PBS)
Voluntary donations (NPR, some software and game developers, some musicians)

MASS MARKETS TO SEGMENTS
Narrowcasting: target smaller audience segments with specialized content
Information technologies
Advertisers’ preferences for targeted audience
Research techniques
Conventional media response to audience demand

NEW MEDIA ECONOMICS
Personalization (thanks to social media)
Not narrowcasting, but specific to you
Not possible with conventional media
Internet: low reproduction and distribution costs

Websites use advertising, too (but with a twist)
Examples: Groupon, Google “adwords”
Traditional media have some advantages in this case

CRITICAL STUDIES
Need for media literacy
Political economy
Marx in Das Kapital: Dominant groups create hegemony
Recently demonstrated in Occupy Wall Street
Content reflects interests of owners, advertisers
Unequal access still an issue
Often undermines traditional culture

Women underrepresented as media producers, Often depicted in “typical” female roles (housewife, nurse, mother, secretary)

Ethnic Media Studies
Racial/ethnic groups also depicted in stereotypical roles
Music videos perpetuate “new racism”
Attitudes also extend into advertising

Media criticism
Genres of media are important
Semiotic analysis examines words and images
Audience plays a role

POSTMODERNISM
Critique of modern technological society
No universal truth
Individual view depends on individual experience
New forms of expression
Nation-states of less concern
What comes next?
Are we already there?

DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS
Explains why people adopt new communication behaviors
Why innovations succeed: advantages of new technology, price, compatibility, social norms, other factors

DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS
Stages of diffusion: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, laggards
Critical mass is necessary

MEDIA’S FUNCTIONS
Surveillance (information)
Interpretation (editorials, The Daily Show, blogs)
Values transmission/socialization (textbooks)
Entertainment (movies, TV, social media)
Functions of new media (self-expression)

MEDIA AND PUBLIC OPINION
Gatekeeping
Agenda setting
Media tell us what to think about
But…the media is not all-powerful
New media might be undermining older media

Framing
Media tell us how to think
Journalists pre-edit their own work

TECHNOLOGICAL DETERMINISM
The medium is the message (McLuhan)
Form, not content, matters
The “global village” (electronically mediated small town)
Technology as dominant social force (Postman)
Technopoly: technology controls all aspects of life

Week #2 – Media & Culture!

Week #2 – Welcome Back to CT-201!

It was great to meet everyone last week! 

Here is the class zoom session recording from 9/7:

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/bZyryVHeIsZi6FXk4veASaArbP9yINHynJewTV8gZGNoznv5T_FNs4bw9xs26rlM.925aMLpw9KPx5lDf

Passcode: 0K2Qe$WG

 

Just in case today is your first day joining our class, or you need a class recap, here is a link to last week’s class introduction blog post, (which also includes a zoom recording of our class session and an assignment.)

Its time to dig in!

So, what exactly is “Communications Technology”..? Here is a wikipedia definition – Does this definition resonate with you?

Is it limiting?

Lets talk about some of the ways that “CT” plays a role in our everyday lives.

**Although the textbook is not mandatory for our class, I will reference it and share excerpts and info from it – I do find that you may find it helpful as a companion, as well as a resource for your final term paper. (The book’s info is on the course syllabus page.)

The Changing Media:

Let’s all take a media/technology inventory, shall we? Let us assess the ownership and use of our communications devices.. Let’s make a list (you write it down or type it out) How many devices do you own, lease or rent in total at the moment? How many are up to date and current? How many are outdated, broken and or just taking up space? How many have you gotten refurbished? How does your experience(s) compare to your parents or grandparents, or to that of students (or family / friends) living in other countries?

——————>

Discussion Board Assignment #1 Media and Culture

Watch the video below – a talk by Nicholas Carr on “What the Internet is doing to our brains”.. (the talk is from 2015 by the way)

Carr asserts and worries that the vast array of interlinked information available through the Internet is eroding attention spans and making contemporary minds distracted and less capable of deep, thoughtful engagement with complex ideas and arguments..

 

In comments section below, please address and answer the follow questions:

(***I strongly suggest that you generate your response(s) using a word processing application like ms word, pages or notes first, make the necessary spelling and grammatical corrections and then copy and paste your work into the comments section below)

What do you think about the video as a whole?

What do you think about Carr’s view?

Do you agree or disagree? Why? Explain your stance.

Do you have other related thoughts or reactions? (which could be in the form of a personal story. Please Share!

Please write a 150 – 300-word response and post it into the comments section below, preferably by our next class time. You will also need to comment on one of your classmates’ responses by the following week as well.

**Looking for more info, context and resources from this author?

Check out the website of Nicholas Carr here.

 

—————————


Summary & Timeline of Information from Chapter 1 of:

 Media now: Understanding media, culture, and technology (9th ed.) Straubhaar, J., LaRose R. & Davenport L. (2015). Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.  


THE CHANGING MEDIA

THE MEDIA IN OUR LIVES
9+ hours per day
8+ hours per day sleeping (6.5 hours for college students)
5 months per year
34 billion bytes per day per person
(We consume and make information)

MEDIA THEN & NOW
4000 B.C. – Written language invented (printing press history link)

1455 – Gutenberg’s Bible is published
1975 – First personal computer introduced
1982 – The CD, the first digital music recording medium, introduced
1991- World Wide Web begins

1995 – First digital hit movies
Telecommunication Act of 1996 reforms U.S. media policy
1998 First U.S. HDTV broadcasts
2004 – Internet reaches 75 percent of American homes
2007-2009 U.S. transition to digital televisions

MEDIA IN CHANGING WORLD
Conventional media: books, newspapers, magazines, radio, TV, film
Impact of digital technology and the Internet
Merging of mass media into new media forms and content

MERGING TECHNOLOGIES
Media convergence
Communication has moved from analog to digital
“Conventional” media outlets now using apps for digital consumption

CHANGING INDUSTRIES
Rise of Apple, Google, Facebook
Conventional media firms are struggling
Economic recession and failed mergers hurt large media firms
Hardest-hit industry: newspapers
Good news (for you!): conventional media are hiring recent college graduates to handle social media

CHANGING LIFESTYLES
Online video, politics
Video games
Conventional media don’t reach young adults
Media on demand, on iPhones and iPads
New media’s impact on culture (new), human relationships (superficial)

CHALLENGING CAREERS
Industry mergers
Decline in technical jobs
Offshoring
Job growth expected for scriptwriters, editors, actors, multimedia artists
Decline in pay for communication workers

SHIFTING REGULATIONS
Telecom Act of 1996
Deregulated industry
Copyright Extension Act
Broadened protection
Digital Millennium Copyright Act
Weakened fair use, cracked down on music “sharing”
Net neutrality
Internet providers shouldn’t favor business partners

RISING SOCIAL ISSUES
Media violence
Concerns about interactive media, especially video games
Digital divide
Social networking revolutions
Internet control

MEDIA THROUGHOUT HISTORY
Pre-agricultural society
Spoken word – lives on today in fairy tales, campfire stories
Agricultural society
Writing develops (but not for all)
Masses illiterate
Books copied by hand
Early version of printing developed

Industrial society
Gutenberg Bible (1455)
Protestant Revolution
Mass production of books
Industrialization = spread of literacy

TODAY: INFORMATION SOCIETY
Economy depends on production and consumption of information
Rise of information workers
Dominant tool: computer
All information industries go digital (telephones, print, film, video games, etc.)

SMCR MODEL
Shannon-Weaver (and others) classic model of mass communication
Source
Message
Channel
Receiver
Feedback
Also takes into account feedback and noise
Social media challenge the SMCR model
Gatekeepers

TYPES OF COMMUNICATION
Intrapersonal
Interpersonal
Small group
Large group
Organizational
Intercultural
Social media (where does it fit?)

WHAT ARE THE MEDIA NOW?
Digital
Interactive
Social media (user-generated)
Asynchronous (time-shift)
Narrowcasting (niche market, segmented)
Multimedia

Welcome to CT-201 – Fall 2022!

Welcome Everyone!

 Here we are: CT-201 – Foundations of Communications Technology!

The Fall Semester of 2022!

Im excited to meet everyone and share our 1st class session to connect and learn about each other.  

Here is the Zoom recording from today’s class session:

https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/IcHg4Ps_KSQt0pNbZa2WeH0MFl6wJNw5e9Yh1LbOgfZHu1JooaMz6S6us1LMT2Dw.T6ffv1eSJTx0ykKq

Passcode: !.D3^Qju

**This is the direct URL / Link to our class Website – https://ct201.commons.gc.cuny.edu/ <—that link is where EVERYTHING is happening for CT-201 – please bookmark it.

I’m not a fan of blackboard (who is?? Its outdated and clunky..) and will only use it to remind the class about password sensitive things or send a mass class e-mail.

Please make sure you are familiar with the CUNY academic calendar for the semester.  

The CT-201 Class Modality / Structure:

CT-201 will be taught synchronously online via Zoom on Wednesdays from 12:30pm – 1:45pm, you are required to attend each session and participate. Our class also functions asynchronously as you complete and participate in our class work via this website and the various assignments discussed through out the semester.

Please know, I am always here to help you be the best that you can be in our course. And we are all here to do the same for each other. Our class is a community! A big part of our class is reactionary, reflective and exploring creative ways to communicate. Please think of this website as a repository of information, energy and inspiration for the course (and beyond!)

*The Class WebsiteOur class website takes place on the CUNY Academic Commons! You will soon discover that the Commons is a huge resource and regular source of inspiration and community! Im excited to share this with you all.

Assignments –  All of our weekly assignment prompts & reminders will be published every Wednesday before class on the Course Schedule Page here <—

Here is another reminder 🙂 – > The direct URL for our course website is – https://ct201.commons.gc.cuny.edu/

**This Week’s Assignment**
Introductions – Let’s leave our first Comment!

In the comments section below (if you scroll down to the bottom of this page) Add your 1st comment!

Your comment will serve as your attendance today, but please take a few moments to introduce yourself and share!

Tell us a bit about yourself, What is your name / nickname (if you have one)? What you are studying here at York College?  What is your favorite movie, activities, ice cream flavor? Favorite places or apps to visit on the web? What are you most interested in at this moment? Etc..) Also, what does “Communications Technology” mean to you? Feel free to add some links! Let’s get to know each other!

Also – Please, reply to someone’s else’s comment, say hello and or share your encouragement or similar some interests.

Commenting and participation on the website is a big part of our class!

**PS -I moderate all the comments to make sure that spam bots don’t spam us into oblivion! If may take a few minutes before your comment shows up, no need to submit it twice if you don’t see it appear right away **

Please explore this website, read through the syllabus and some of the course resources (I will add many more as we go forward each week!), it will be super helpful in the next coming weeks.

 

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